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Virtual Room 3
Feb 03, 2021 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM (Europe/Amsterdam) Switch to local time
20210203T1600 20210203T1730 Europe/Amsterdam Special Session: Territorial Approach to Climate Action and Resilience

Background

The impacts of climate change pose unique challenges for adaptation varying across places. Extreme precipitation and related storms, floods, torrents and landslides will continue to damage critical infrastructure as well as private economic assets. Prolonged extreme temperature events will increase energy demand for space cooling and exacerbate existing inequalities (IEA, 2016) and also have serious, sometimes catastrophic, implications for ecosystems (Harris et al., 2018). Rural economies in particular are largely resource-based and are reliant on well-functioning ecosystem services such as healthy soils, clean water, pollination and a stable climate. Both urban and rural areas are expected to experience major impacts on water availability and supply in the coming years, with potential changes in water quality and quantity resulting in fierce competition between water uses (OECD, 2016a). Local urban heat islands can exacerbate local temperature increases, alter small-scale processes (e.g. land-sea breeze effect) and modify meteorology, thereby increasing the risk of heat-related mortality (IPCC, 2014), for instance in areas with limited green space and inadequate access to health services. Moreover, local capacity to plan for and implement robust adaptation measures is highly diverse, and the im ...

Virtual Room 3 56th ISOCARP World Planning Congress congress@isocarp.org

Background

The impacts of climate change pose unique challenges for adaptation varying across places. Extreme precipitation and related storms, floods, torrents and landslides will continue to damage critical infrastructure as well as private economic assets. Prolonged extreme temperature events will increase energy demand for space cooling and exacerbate existing inequalities (IEA, 2016) and also have serious, sometimes catastrophic, implications for ecosystems (Harris et al., 2018). Rural economies in particular are largely resource-based and are reliant on well-functioning ecosystem services such as healthy soils, clean water, pollination and a stable climate. Both urban and rural areas are expected to experience major impacts on water availability and supply in the coming years, with potential changes in water quality and quantity resulting in fierce competition between water uses (OECD, 2016a). Local urban heat islands can exacerbate local temperature increases, alter small-scale processes (e.g. land-sea breeze effect) and modify meteorology, thereby increasing the risk of heat-related mortality (IPCC, 2014), for instance in areas with limited green space and inadequate access to health services. Moreover, local capacity to plan for and implement robust adaptation measures is highly diverse, and the impacts of climate change and extreme events can vary widely across regions and cities within the same country.


Climate change also poses significant risks to economic resilience, particularly in terms of threats to macroeconomic and fiscal sustainability resulting from climate-related shocks. Modelling projections for a high-end sea-level rise scenario (1.3 metres) indicate that coastal flooding may incur global annual damage costs up to USD 50 trillion – nearly 4% of global GDP – by the end of the century without adequate adaptation measures (OECD, 2019b). Global health crises such as COVID-19 underscore the dire consequences of limited preparedness when facing a world-wide emergency – a stark reminder for urgent climate action – and serve as a dramatic compounding risk to climate change, for which many cities', regions' and countries' overall risk management systems have yet to prepare.


The unprecedented economic crisis caused by the containment measures related to COVID-19 may set back progress on climate action several precious years, although governments have an opportunity to align stimulus measures with efforts to limit climate risks in the spirit of "building back better and greener". In fact, approaching the economic recovery using a well-being lens to climate mitigation (OECD, 2019c), can effectively increase the likelihood of reaching Paris Agreement goals, while also bringing the possibility to advance other well-being agendas (e.g. health, equity, jobs, housing, accessibility, biodiversity). Despite a temporary fall in CO2 emissions due to reduced economic activity in response to COVID-19, the atmospheric concentration of CO2 continues to grow rapidly, which needs to be urgently addressed.


A territorial approach to climate action can promote place-based policy responses to accelerate efforts to mitigate climate change and to more effectively adapt to its localised impacts. A territorial approach allows decision makers to better incorporate context-specific climate change drivers and impacts, and to tailor support and measures. The scale and complexity of the challenges posed by the growing climate emergency highlight why such an approach is needed to scale up ambitious climate action from across levels of government in a country.


The OECD Programme A Territorial Approach to Climate Action and Resilience aims to support national, regional and local policymakers in their efforts to develop and implement their climate plans, strategies and policy instruments, by proposing a new policy framework applying a territorial approach. To achieve this goal, the programme will:


  1. Strengthen the evidence base by developing "zero-carbon transition and climate resilience benchmarks", to help countries understand subnational climate action potential and identify synergies/trade-offs between climate & well-being outcomes;
  2. Analyse national and subnational climate policy and governance frameworks across sectors, and develop a "checklist for action" to support policy reform;
  3. Collect, analyse and disseminate innovative climate policies and initiatives as well as economic stimulus measures that place climate at the centre of priorities; and
  4. Track subnational climate finance. 

Objectives of the session

The objective of the session is to introduce the concept of a territorial approach to climate action and resilience and discuss how national urban policies can accelerate climate action. The session will identify the key roles/synergies/trade-offs of cities and regions in mitigating and adapting to climate change, including through urban planning and design, especially in light of the COVID-19 recovery.

Programme/Agenda 

Moderators:
Frank D'hondt, ISOCARP 
Tadashi Matsumoto, OECD

16:00 - 16:10Scene setting: Cities' & regions' key roles for climate action and resilience: the need to apply a territorial approach
Tadashi Matsumoto, OECD
16:10 - 16:18Accelerating urban climate action 
Harriet Bulkeley, Durham University
16:18 - 16:25Urban opportunities and the role of NUPs 
Nick Godfrey, Coalition for Urban Transitions
16:25 - 16:33Country Perspective - Mexico
Oscar Javier Garduno Arredondo, the Secretariat of Agrarian Land, and Urban Development (SEDATU), Mexico
16:33 - 16:40City Perspective 
Yunus Arikan, Global Advocacy, ICLEI
16:40 - 17:20Open Discussion with Speakers and Audience

Moderated by: 
Tadashi Matsumoto, OECD
Frank D'hondt, ISOCARP
17:20 - 17:30Summary and Closing


Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)
Head of Unit
Mr Frank D'hondt
ISOCARP
Secretary-General
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