Track 2: Ensuring the Economic Diversity and Resilience Virtual Room 2
Dec 10, 2020 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM(Europe/Amsterdam)
20201210T1600 20201210T1730 Europe/Amsterdam Track 2 | Session 2. Territorial oriented, evaluation and definition of transformation needs

The first part of this session will focus on regeneration economy theories and practices. Case studies on spatial uses of structures and collaboration efforts to restore a district's real estate and economic value and the physical and digital tools and means to evaluate and define the influential impacts are addressed in the submitted case studies.

The second part of Session 2 explores spatial planning case studies on event driven planning, tourism vs. urbanization planning, and growth and transition of industrial lands. These case studies apply use of empirical research, statistical distribution, and regression data. City planning and regenerative planning evaluations are applied in the case studies to ensure development has the ability to address both current and long-term planning and infrastructure needs. In the case of industrial developments, local, regional, and global influences, digital economy practices and spatial economic structures are applied and analyzed to implement development strategies that ensure feasible and optimal economic outputs.

Virtual Room 2 56th ISOCARP World Planning Congress, Virtual Congress congress@isocarp.org

The first part of this session will focus on regeneration economy theories and practices. Case studies on spatial uses of structures and collaboration efforts to restore a district's real estate and economic value and the physical and digital tools and means to evaluate and define the influential impacts are addressed in the submitted case studies.

The second part of Session 2 explores spatial planning case studies on event driven planning, tourism vs. urbanization planning, and growth and transition of industrial lands. These case studies apply use of empirical research, statistical distribution, and regression data. City planning and regenerative planning evaluations are applied in the case studies to ensure development has the ability to address both current and long-term planning and infrastructure needs. In the case of industrial developments, local, regional, and global influences, digital economy practices and spatial economic structures are applied and analyzed to implement development strategies that ensure feasible and optimal economic outputs.

Development of industrial lands and influencing factors towards new economic strategies in China——Analysis based on panel regressionsView Abstract
Research Paper 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM (Europe/Amsterdam) 2020/12/10 15:00:00 UTC - 2020/12/10 16:30:00 UTC
Industrial lands in China deserve new investigation as China is transferring from the high-speed development mode into new normal economy stage. We measured the development of industrial lands in China in the past two decades. Using urban industrial-construction proportion and location quotient for industrial lands (LQ) as indicators, we found that: (1) Industrial lands were generally growing slower than construction lands, and the national proportion decreased to about 20%; (2) Hot spot provinces, with a LQ above 1, and hot spot capital cities, with a proportion above 20%, were concentrating to eastern regions. After building panel data based on 25 capital cities in 6 years that cover the past two decades, we conducted regressions in different regions and periods. Generally, economic development was significantly and strongly influential to proportions. Industry structures in terms of both second and tertiary industry show negative relationships in the second decade. Industrial land prices were positive related to proportions in eastern regions but negative related in central and western China. Unexpected findings include the negative coefficient of foreign investment and fiscal expenditures on technology and education. Our study provides new investigation of industrial lands towards new development stage and helps raise understanding of factors influencing industrial lands in developing countries.
Presenters
JX
Jiahui XU
Postgraduate, School Of Architecture, Tsinghua University
Co-authors
SC
Song CHEN
School Of Architecture, Tsinghua University
TY
Taofang YU
School Of Architecture, Tsinghua University
EFFECTS OF PLATFORM ECONOMIES ON INFORMAL SETTLEMENTS IN SÃO PAULO, BRAZILView Abstract
Case Study Report 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM (Europe/Amsterdam) 2020/12/10 15:00:00 UTC - 2020/12/10 16:30:00 UTC
This research analyses the extreme consequences of platform capitalism on the fragile urban composition of informal settlements in São Paulo, Brazil. The illusion of immateriality often hides the very physical effects of platform economies on urban space. Hidden effects include uncontrolled space consumption, slowdown of public transport development, variations of real estate prices and boost of gentrification. In the present crisis, digital economies workers are, as usual, the most exposed class, and in some cases the only that is forced to work at their own risk. This research describes, through tools of urban analysis and data science, the inequality that pervades this system and aims to imagine architectural devices that act within and against this framework. Quantitative analysis has been made possible thanks to the access of huge data sets and this works provides accurate mappings on phenomena that are usually hard to visualize on urban scale such as the use of Uber and Instagram or the presence of Airbnb. Starting from these hidden dynamics three projects imagine monumental devices for wealth redistribution in the global city. Reversing the relationship between digital and physical space these projects state a new paradigm for a post-crisis urban governance that protects its most fragile and crowded areas for the benefit of the whole urban environment. This research was born as my thesis project co-tutored by Stefano Boeri (Politecnico of Milan) and Francisco Spadoni ( FAU, University of São Paulo).
Presenters
FG
Federico Godino
New requests of regeneration for tertiary-office districts: what kind of evolution is possible? From a European perspective to the case of the Milan Metropolitan area, ItalyView Abstract
Research Paper 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM (Europe/Amsterdam) 2020/12/10 15:00:00 UTC - 2020/12/10 16:30:00 UTC
Inside the framework proposed by the Track, this contribution intends to focus on the topic of regeneration and retrofitting of tertiary-office areas and buildings. In many European contexts, in fact, the condition of under-utilized (or even dismissed) offices and directional districts is a significant reality: see for example the cases of Amsterdam Amstel in The Netherland, the Part Dieu district in Lion, France, but also many other Europeans case and reflections (Agence Francois Leclercq 2015, Bergevoet T., van Tuijl M. 2016, Fernández G.A. 2018). These interventions can be related to previous periods of economic growth and real-estate developments, or to important projects at regional and national levels that have not maintained over the years a high level of attractiveness for tertiary, institutional or scientific functions. Another aspect to be considered is the distance from the core of the agglomeration, being an important factor that influences the features of the district, its economic value and trajectory, the settled activities. In addition, many projects of regeneration of tertiary districts have been settled only in relation to the condition of vacancy: there are also growing demands of environmental and energetic quality, better public spaces and sustainable mobility, the need to articulate a wider range of practices and innovative workplaces. More recently, also considering the effects of Covid-19 pandemic and its following consequences, tertiary districts and workplaces will be affected by many changes and new requests. Some of them will not be intensely used anymore, workers and company (if possible) will avoid long-trip commuting in favour of smart-working, new demands and requests of modification will arise. In previous research phases, different projects of the European office district’s regeneration have been analysed (Fini 2019, Armondi, Fini 2020), putting in evidence both policies and planning instruments, and urban design devices and tools. Defining a further step on this line of research, this contribution wants to focus now on the Metropolitan area of Milan, the strongest city in Italy for various tertiary and economic activities (many related for instance to the fashion industry, news and editorial activities, publicity and design. What kind of vacant offices spaces is it possible to identify in this metropolitan area and how to “typify” them (i.e. scattered and punctual situations or complex mono-functional districts)? What planning tools and actions are defined by municipal and metropolitan institutions or even by the private sector? What suggestions can be traced from the previously analysed European cases – in addition to the institutional or academic debate - for this specific context? The paper, so, wants to define a “constructive” link between the general framework, cases already analysed, and the context of Milan, its current condition and arising questions of retrofitting office buildings and districts. References: Armondi S., Fini G. (2020), “The Changing Spatialities of Employment. Geographies of Industry and Services”, in: Leal Filho W., Azul A., Brandli L., et al. (eds.), Encyclopedia of the UN Sustainable Development Goals. Sustainable Cities and Communities, Springer Nature Switzerland. Agence Francois Leclercq (2015), “La Défense. Vers un Quartier d’Affaires a haut niveau de services”, Urbanisme, no. 54, pp.58-63. Bergevoet T., van Tuijl M., (2016), The Flexible City: Sustainable Solutions for a Europe in Transition. Rotterdam: NAI Publishers. Fernández G.A. (2018), “New Productive Uses Areas. Central Business Districts (CBD), Business Parks, Technology Parks and Corporate Cities”, in Medina C.D., Monclús J. (eds.), Urban Visions. From Planning Culture to Landscape Urbanism, pp.197-206, Springer International Publishing, Cham. G. Fini (2019), “Lione Part-Dieu e Amsterdam Amstel: approcci e dispositivi di rigenerazione di due aree terziarie internazionali”, Territorio, n. 90, pp. 120-130.
Presenters GIULIA FINI
Assistant Professor, POLITECNICO DI MILANO, DAStU Department Of Architecture And Urban Planning
Coworking in Lisbon: experiences of collaboration and sharing on changing urban contextsView Abstract
Research Paper 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM (Europe/Amsterdam) 2020/12/10 15:00:00 UTC - 2020/12/10 16:30:00 UTC
The concept of coworking emerged in the early 2000s. Rapidly, these collaborative spaces proliferated all over the world, often installing themselves in renovated and reconverted places, offering shared offices and hosting a variety of activities for different types of users, such as events, training, networking sessions, among others. Its members, mainly freelancers, entrepreneurs, startups, small companies, seek values of collaboration, openness, knowledge sharing, promoting partnerships and social interaction (1, 2). Innovative and creative ecosystems, such as Coworking Spaces (CWS), have attracted the attention of the media, politicians and academics, due to their ability to adjust under pressure, providing new solutions for changes in production and work regimes and stimulating urban regeneration processes (see, for example, the work of 3–5). However, a systematic and interdisciplinary approach to the study of this phenomenon is not yet in place. A holistic vision can promote a more comprehensive and integrated action to solve urban problems and long-lasting improvement (3). The paper seeks to explore: a) A first empirical approach to identifying CWS, by mapping them in Lisbon as a testbed to the overall municipalities of the Lisbon metropolitan area, and b) Preliminary reactions/solutions/impacts of CWS in the face of the current moment. These changes have sparked a debate on how to best respond to current and future crises, before the incomparable effects on cities, work patterns and life routines. The paper is part of a broader project that encompasses the mapping, decoding and classification of CWS in the Lisbon metropolitan area (LMA). The analysis of the Lisbon case study may contribute to a deeper understanding of the phenomenon, benefiting of the participation of its members in the international COST Action (CA)18214 “The geography of the new workspaces and the impact on the periphery” (www.new-working-spaces.eu) with the following objectives: i) to investigate and characterize new workspaces (definitions, typologies and geographical distributions); ii) to identify best practices and direct and indirect impacts; iii) to develop guidelines for tailor-made policies and planning measures. 1. Fuzi A. (2015) Coworking spaces for promoting entrepreneurship in sparse regions: the case of South Wales. Regional Studies, Regional Science; 2(1):462–9. 2. Merkel J. (2015) Coworking in the city. Ephemera; 15(2):121–39. Disponível em: http://www.ephemerajournal.org/contribution/coworking-city 3. Durante G., Turvani M. (2018) Coworking, the Sharing Economy, and the City: Which Role for the ‘Coworking Entrepreneur’? Urban Science; 2(3):83. 4. Capdevila I. (2019) Joining a collaborative space: is it really a better place to work? Journal of Business Strategy, 40(2):14–21. 5. Akhavan M., Mariotti (2018) The effects of coworking spaces on local communities in the Italian context. Territorio; 87(8):85–92.
Presenters
SM
Sofia Morgado
Professora Aux. Agreg., Lisbon School Of Architecture, University Of Lisbon
Co-authors
ET
Elisabete Tomaz
Researcher, DINAMIA’CET, ISCTE – Instituto Universitário De Lisboa
CH
Cristina Henriques
CIAUD, Lisbon School Of Architecture, University Of Lisbon
PC
Patrícia C. Melo
Prof. Assoc., ISEG-Lisbon School Of Economics And Management, Universidade De Lisboa And REM/UECE
Research on urban industrial development of capital metropolitan area, ChinaView Abstract
Research Paper 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM (Europe/Amsterdam) 2020/12/10 15:00:00 UTC - 2020/12/10 16:30:00 UTC
In the past 40 years, China has been in a rapid urbanization phase, a high-quality urbanization strategic pattern based on the "city group - metropolitan areas - national central city - coordinated development of small and medium cities - characteristic towns - rural revitalization" as a system, the metropolitan area plays a key role in connecting the preceding with the following. With the further development of urbanization, it is of great strategic significance to pay attention to the construction of metropolitan areas for promoting the coordinated development of regions. Cultivating a modern metropolitan area involves social management, public services, industrial development and other aspects. This study take the capital metropolitan area with extremely unbalanced development as the object, and study its development status and optimization strategies from the perspective of industrial coordinated development. Economic globalization leads to the transformation of world city system, and the spatial economic structure characterized by "industrial chain" is transforming to the spatial economic structure characterized by "value chain". Zilai Tang and Miaoxi Zhao put forward the method of value-added hierarchy analysis to investigate the hierarchical system, basic characteristics and development changes of regional spatial economic structure, which provides a basis for the coordination of regional economy in the formulation of industrial policy. In addition, in order to further deepen the research on industrial structure, clarify the types of leading industries in each city and avoid homogeneous development, the location entropy index proposed by P.Haggett is of great significance for analyzing the situation of regional leading specialized departments. First, this study summarizes the research results of the existing metropolitan area, defines the research scope of the capital metropolitan area, and analyzes the development status, changing trend and reasons of the urban industries in the capital metropolitan area based on the basic data such as the output value of the three industries. Second, the value-added hierarchy analysis method is adopted to reveal the industrial division system in the metropolitan area based on the data of industrial added value of each city in the capital metropolitan area in 2015, and the optimization target is proposed according to the domestic policy requirements for the industrial development of the modern metropolitan area. Third, taking the central cities of Beijing and Tianjin as the research objects, location entropy and Boston matrix analysis were adopted to analyze the degree of specialization of the tertiary industry in the two cities based on the added value data of different industries in the two cities in 2016, so as to avoid excessive homogenization and promote the high-level coordinated development of the service industry in the central cities. The results show that the industrial development of the capital metropolitan area still has great room for improvement. a) The development gap between the central city and the surrounding cities is significant, and the surrounding cities are still far from realizing the development goal of advanced manufacturing dominated by high-value sectors. b) In order to promote the high-level coordinated development of the service industry in the central cities of the capital metropolitan area, it is necessary to further clarify the direction of professional development, promote the outward distribution of other service industries, and avoid homogeneous competition. With the increasingly clear division of labor in the global value chain, the approach of using the data of added value of sector to study the regional spatial economic structure and characteristics of the research method is of great significance to the economic diversity.
Presenters
YL
Yunna Li
School Of Architecture And Urban Planning, Tongji University
XZ
Xiaomeng Zhang
Postgraduates, School Of Architecture And Urban Planning, Tongji University
Challenges for Urban Tourism in Facing Urbanization, Case Study: Bali, IndonesiaView Abstract
Case Study Report 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM (Europe/Amsterdam) 2020/12/10 15:00:00 UTC - 2020/12/10 16:30:00 UTC
Bali, as known as Land of the Gods, is one of the most famous tourist destinations in Indonesia. Around 16,3 Million tourists visited Bali in 2019. Offering its natural beauty attraction and an authentic cultural ambiance, Bali has many beautiful places to explore. One of the most favorite places to visit in Bali is Ubud. Ubud located northeast from Denpasar City, or around 90 minutes from Ngurah Rai International Airport. Located in a hilly area, the ambiance in Ubud is more peaceful and cool than in coastal areas like Kuta or Seminyak. Ubud has many natural attractions and beautiful scenery to explore, for example, terraced rice fields, valley, and rafting. Besides natural beauty, Ubud also has some cultural attractions like museums, cultural festivals, handicrafts, and art products. It attracted around 2 Million tourists to visit Ubud in 2019, contributing to 12,5% Bali tourists. Monkey forest is the most visited place in Ubud that attract at least 1 million tourists in a year. As tourism developed, the need for space for supporting facilities like accommodation (hotel and resort), restaurants, cafes, and so on also increases. It resulted that the urbanization in Ubud is growing uncontrolled and sprawl. Based on Housing and Settlement Plan in the Gianyar Regency project in 2018, the overlay of the conservation area and figure-ground map resulted that urban sprawl in Ubud occupied the conservation areas. Furthermore, Ubud slowly lost its best ambiance as the congestion is getting worse, and the city becomes more crowded. Environmental degradation risk also increases as luxury resorts and hotels in Ubud develop in the conservation area in purpose to provide the best scenery. Uncontrolled urbanization leads to a decrease in the value of Ubud as a tourism area. This project found that the lack of control for spatial use and inadequate instruments for spatial use management caused the infringement of spatial plan. Moreover, overlapping and inconsistent regulation between spatial plan and tourism plan makes building accommodation in the conservation area was possible. To overcome the problems, an integrated tourism masterplan and spatial plan in Ubud is a necessity. Furthermore, a strong leadership, qualified institution, and adequate instrument for spatial use management and control needed to maintain development planning.
Presenters Dayinta Pinasthika
Researcher, Citieslab
Impacts of event-driven mega projects on surrounding neighbourhoods - the case of the London Olympic ParkView Abstract
Research Paper 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM (Europe/Amsterdam) 2020/12/10 15:00:00 UTC - 2020/12/10 16:30:00 UTC
London won the bid to host the 2012 Olympic games due to its focus on urban regeneration (Poynter, 2009). Aiming to redevelop one of the most deprived areas of the city, the 2012 Olympics would drive jobs and investments, and improve skills and quality of life in East London (Hansard, 2005). This paper conducts an empirical research to identify if, and how far these urban development goals have been met in the years after the games. The spatial changes to the street and transportation network, that have been brought about as a direct result of the construction of the Olympic Park and the regenerative efforts in its immediate vicinity are studied using space syntax theory and method and compared to the changes in socio-economic indicators before and after the Olympics, including - population density, employment density, income, house prices, health and well-being, housing and living environment, crime, and education. Direct causes and effects are identified through statistical regression, which are also tested within incremental distances from the London Olympic Park to identify the physical extent of the impact. Through this study, it is identified that there have been significant changes to population, employment, per capita income, living environment and crime around the park, which correlates directly to changes in the spatial environment. However, it is also identified that the extent of the impact is limited to 1600m from the Olympic park, 8 years after the event, which strongly coincides with the London Legacy Development Corporation (LLDC) limits. This indicates that the regenerative efforts often stop with the facilities planned and built for the event and it takes a very long time for the benefits to trickle down to the surrounding neighbourhoods. In the context of the city of Doha and the upcoming World Cup in 2022, this study can provide insight into the benefits and shortcomings of event-driven planning and offer suggestions for ensuring wide-reaching benefits of hosting an event.
Presenters Deepthi John
Architect And Urban Designer, University College London
Co-authors
KK
Kayvan Karimi
Associate Professor, University College London
postgraduate
,
School of Architecture, Tsinghua University
Assistant Professor
,
POLITECNICO DI MILANO, DAStU Department of Architecture and Urban Planning
Professora Aux. Agreg.
,
Lisbon School of Architecture, University of Lisbon
School of architecture and urban planning, Tongji University
+ 2 more speakers. View All
 Lorraine Gonzales
Senior Planner
,
Clackamas County
Dr Hanna Obracht-Prondzynska
Assistant Professor
,
Gdansk University of Technology
Dr Michael Karassowitsch
Professor, Acting Design Chair
,
VIT Vellore School of Planning and Architecture
Mr Mukhlis Silmi Kaffah
Student
,
Bandung Institute of Technology
Program Navigator