Virtual Room 3
Jan 13, 2021 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM(Europe/Amsterdam)
20210113T1600 20210113T1730 Europe/Amsterdam Track 4 | Session 3. Building Back Better

Following a disaster, how can cities and their communities build back better? Building on the model of ecological footprints, researchers from Chongqing University in China assess geo-ecological restoration of mountain towns after disasters, focusing on the county of Lushan which was subject to a major earthquake in 2013. Along the Portuguese coast, historic and deactivated artillery infrastructure leaves a question mark – should the remnants of conflict be reclaimed by their natural surrounds, highlighted for their cultural and historical significance, or adapted to help defend against the contemporary threat of climate change? The literature and cartography of historic flooding in the Vistula river delta in Poland is studied to identify a code that could affect the region's future resilience to flooding. A representative of the World Resources Institute considers climate-sensitive urban design to minimise the environmental risks of developing the New Capital City (NCC) in East Kalimantan, Indonesia. The potential for future urban growth in Harbin, China is considered in the context of its ecological carrying capacity. How can thinking around smart cities be used in Hubbali City, India to assess placemaking as a tool to contribute to people's health, happiness, and wellbeing. In present day research on the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic and associated recovery strategies, researchers from Berkeley University of California critically examine the role of planning and the planner in enabling equitable and disaster resilient cities. Separately, press releases from four Chinese mega cities are assessed in detail to learn how to enhance community resilience; and resear ...

Virtual Room 3 56th ISOCARP World Planning Congress, Virtual Congress congress@isocarp.org

Following a disaster, how can cities and their communities build back better? Building on the model of ecological footprints, researchers from Chongqing University in China assess geo-ecological restoration of mountain towns after disasters, focusing on the county of Lushan which was subject to a major earthquake in 2013. Along the Portuguese coast, historic and deactivated artillery infrastructure leaves a question mark – should the remnants of conflict be reclaimed by their natural surrounds, highlighted for their cultural and historical significance, or adapted to help defend against the contemporary threat of climate change? The literature and cartography of historic flooding in the Vistula river delta in Poland is studied to identify a code that could affect the region's future resilience to flooding. A representative of the World Resources Institute considers climate-sensitive urban design to minimise the environmental risks of developing the New Capital City (NCC) in East Kalimantan, Indonesia. The potential for future urban growth in Harbin, China is considered in the context of its ecological carrying capacity. How can thinking around smart cities be used in Hubbali City, India to assess placemaking as a tool to contribute to people's health, happiness, and wellbeing. In present day research on the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic and associated recovery strategies, researchers from Berkeley University of California critically examine the role of planning and the planner in enabling equitable and disaster resilient cities. Separately, press releases from four Chinese mega cities are assessed in detail to learn how to enhance community resilience; and research is undertaken on how public spaces can be better planned to create healthy urban places. 

Minimizing the Impacts of Indonesia New Capital City Development on Environmental Services and the Changing ClimateView Abstract
Case Study Report 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM (Europe/Amsterdam) 2021/01/13 15:00:00 UTC - 2021/01/13 16:30:00 UTC
The massive development of new capital city (NCC) in East Kalimantan inevitably will create land use change from previously dominated by forest to urbanized area. As consequences, the built-up area development in a forest rich island therefore will bring disruption to the ecosystem, impacting on the services provided, and causing adverse impacts to human life. This paper assesses the potential impacts resulted by NCC development on environmental services disruption. We limit our scope of study in three environmental services, namely: flood prevention, water provision, and fire prevention. Unavoidable impact of climate change on environment and human life will undoubtedly worsen the environmental services disruptions resulted from the city development. Using the spatial analysis on the watershed ecosystem, fire hot spot and peat land distribution, we identified the potential risk area. On the other hand, we also identified the high conservation value area within the planned NCC region and how significant the changing landscape impacts to the ecosystem services provision if the proportion of the built-up area of NCC take places. Based on those findings, the paper suggests the climate-sensitive design as the urban planning approach to minimize the impacts of built-up conversion. We expect that our paper will enrich the discussion on the urban-nature development and contribute to the planning discourse of NCC development. Keyword: Ecosystem Services, The Capital, Indonesia
Presenters Zuraidah Said
Forest And Climate Research Analyst, World Resources Institute Indonesia
RW
Retno Wihanesta
Research Analyst, WRI Indonesia
Hendricus Andy Simarmata
President Of Indonesian Association Of Urban And Regional Planners, Indonesian Association Of Urban And Regional Planners
Study on evaluation of geo-ecological restoration of mountainous towns upon the influence of geological disasters —a case study of Lushan countyView Abstract
Research Paper 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM (Europe/Amsterdam) 2021/01/13 15:00:00 UTC - 2021/01/13 16:30:00 UTC
Not only geological disasters caused economic losses and casualties, but also it destroyed the original geo-ecological structure and functions, especially in geo-ecologically sensitive mountain towns. This paper assessed geo-ecological restoration of mountain towns after disasters, which was very important for the scientific management of geological ecology. Therefore, aiming to figure out geological disasters and geo-ecology concepts, this paper built up a geo-ecological footprint model by adding the impact of geo-ecological considerations to the traditional model. this paper based on the traditional ecological footprint model, built a geo-ecological footprint model by adding the impact of geo-ecological considerations. Evaluating the geo-ecological restoration situation in Lushan County from 2010 to 2017, this paper analyzed Lushan county’s geo-ecology changes in time series, and quantitatively studied the degree of geo-ecological restoration. this paper wants to construct an improved geo-ecological restoration evaluation model, which included geo-ecological evaluation and economic evaluation index, to further evaluate the geo-ecological restoration situation in the Lushan earthquake-stricken area. The results showed that geological disasters had a long-term and both positive and negative impacts on the geo-ecology of mountain towns, especially in cultivated land and forest. Specifically, the geo-ecological footprint per capita of Lushan county saw a downturn, the geo-ecological deficits per capita decreased slightly, and the geo-ecological restoration has been gradually repaired. In terms of economic restoration index, the resource utilization efficiency of Lushan has gradually shifted towards sustainable utilization. However, considering the geo-ecological restoration index, the overall geological ecology of Lushan is in an unsustainable state. The ecological pressure value indicates that this place is in an unsafe area, and the geological ecological environment is under great pressure. Although the overall post-disaster geo-ecological restoration had some achieved positive results, further efforts should be made to catch up with the goal of ecological sustainability. In terms of this situation, this paper assessed the post-disaster mountain town geo-ecology restoration and proposed countermeasure. Amid the current COVID-19 outbreak, geo-ecology as the foundation of ecological security can provide an assessment. when assessing the implementation of healthy city and national spatial planning.
Presenters
NA
Na An
Postgraduate Student, Chongqing University
WZ
Wei Zeng
Editor-in-Chief 《Journal Of Human Settlement In West China》、Canadian Professor, Chongqing University
Co-authors Binman Yang
Politecnico Di Torino
Enabling equitable and disaster resilient cities: governance in the covid-19 reset View Abstract
Session Proposal 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM (Europe/Amsterdam) 2021/01/13 15:00:00 UTC - 2021/01/13 16:30:00 UTC
COVID-19 demands a critical assessment of current governance failures. With over 150 million people worldwide at risk of eviction and being homeless, to “COVID flight” of tech and knowledge based workers fleeing high dense urban centers for “socially distant” suburbs and remote/rural areas, COVID-19 is reckoning a great reset of cities and metropolitan areas, what governance looks like in prioritizing public good and how this governance effects regional resiliency to disasters and future pandemics. This pandemic along with the intersections of colonizing stolen land from Native/indigenous populations, slavery, genocide and the growing amount of disasters such as hurricanes and flooding are perpetuating challenges in governing COVID-19. The role of planning and the planner will be critically examined through a systems approach, addressing anti Asian and Middle East biases in planning, disaster planning and governance for resilient regions, how COVID-19 effects governance and financial viability of mass scale smart infrastructure projects, planning and disaster recovery, and action steps for planners, financiers, government officials and engineering firms can take to address the COVID-19 reset in planning. Western and Western European approaches to planning have directly correlated to increase in COVID-19 cases, deaths and rising racial inequities. Countries like New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, UAE, and Vietnam have been global leaders in managing COVID-19 community spread and deaths. These countries, specifically Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan and UAE have been building smart cities at a faster pace than western society. Examining governance patterns and best practices in resilient infrastructure planning, this effect on COVID-19 response, and considerations for governance and which models are best practices for adoption in the great COVID-19 reset will be examined critically in this session.
Presenters David Capelli
Co-Founder And Director Of Global Partnerships , #SmartCohort- UC Berkeley Center For Information Technology Research In Interest Of Society (CITRIS) Foundry
CM
Carla Mays
Co-Founder & Head Of Research, #SmartCohort
Research on healthy urban resilience public space planningView Abstract
Research Paper 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM (Europe/Amsterdam) 2021/01/13 15:00:00 UTC - 2021/01/13 16:30:00 UTC
Since the outbreak of the COVID-19 in early 2020, cities in China and even around the world have encountered great challenges, placing higher demands on urban governance and urban resilience, and the creation of healthy urban resilience public spaces is imminent. As an important stage of life for urban residents, urban public space is a complex manifestation of urban functions and an indispensable link in strengthening the city's resilience. In this paper, through the analysis of the connotation of urban resilience and related research at home and abroad, we further interpret the connotation and characteristics of urban public space resilience, and build a model of urban public space resilience based on the timeline of disasters. 1. Optimize the structure of public space and create a resilient spatial pattern; 2. Improve the infrastructure of public space and reserve emergency sites during disasters to use urban land flexibly; 3. Adjust the internal and external transportation system of public space to create healthy and green transportation; 4. Optimize the city Ventilated corridors to improve the resilience of the public space environment; 5. Make full use of the intelligent analysis of the GIS platform to improve the ecological disaster prevention capabilities of public spaces.
Presenters
YG
Yihui Ge.
Chongqing University
Co-authors
xk
Xia Kang
Evaluation of land resources carrying capacity in HarbinView Abstract
Research Paper 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM (Europe/Amsterdam) 2021/01/13 15:00:00 UTC - 2021/01/13 16:30:00 UTC
While dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic crisis, we have realized that sustainable living environment is very important for human survival. The natural resource and material carrier of urban environment is land. As a kind of resource, it is the most basic and important guarantee in the process of human production and life development.The sustainable use of land means that human beings have a long-term living environment. The evaluation of the carrying capacity of land resources is helpful for effectively formulating the development plan of land resources, which is of great practical significance to promote the sustainable use of land resources. Based on the Harbin data of urban economic and social development and land resource development, this paper establishes an evaluation system of land resource carrying capacity in Harbin, which includes four aspects: population carrying capacity, ecological carrying capacity of construction land, carrying capacity of construction scale and economic carrying capacity. This paper evaluates and analyzes the carrying capacity of land resources in Harbin, and obtains the following results. (1)The population carrying capacity of land resources in Harbin is divided into two parts for quantitative evaluation.One is the population carrying capacity of urban construction land, and the other is the population carrying capacity of cultivated land. In the population carrying capacity of urban construction land, this paper uses the per capita index method to evaluate the population carrying capacity of different regions, and draws the conclusion that the population carrying capacity of different regions is unbalanced, which is higher in the city center and the East the West than in other regions. In the evaluation of cultivated land carrying capacity, it calculates the ratio of the total local grain output to the per capita grain consumption standard (400kg). It can be seen that the population carrying capacity of land resources in Harbin is far greater than the pressure of local population, but the distribution of that in different region is unbalanced. (2)In the ecological carrying capacity of construction land, the ecological suitable amount of construction land in Harbin is 8221km2, and the area of urban construction land is smaller than that of ecological suitable construction land, which shows that the ecological carrying capacity of construction land can not only fully bear the current pressure of construction land development in Harbin, but also has half of the bearing space. (3)In the carrying capacity of construction scale, Harbin's comprehensive plot ratio is 0.58, slightly higher than the national average plot ratio of 0.56. It shows that the scale of land resources construction in Harbin still has certain potential. (4)The economic carrying capacity is based on the average GDP of land. In 2018, Harbin achieved a national GDP ranking of 32 (630.05 billion yuan), but its GDP per capita ranked 94. It shows that the economic carrying capacity of land resources in Harbin is relatively weak, but it also shows that the potential of urban land value-added is very large. The conclusion is that the carrying capacity of land resources in Harbin is relatively high and has certain potential, and it can support the current economic, social, development and construction activities.
Presenters
YG
Ye Gao
Harbin Institute Of Technology (HIT)
YB
Yujing Bai
Harbin Institute Of Technology
Co-authors
RG
Rong Guo
Harbin Institute Of Technology
Community Response to Public Health Emergency and Thoughts on Improving the Resilience of Community Planning:A Case Study of Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou and Shenzhen based on online NewsView Abstract
Case Study Report 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM (Europe/Amsterdam) 2021/01/13 15:00:00 UTC - 2021/01/13 16:30:00 UTC
Communities are the front lines facing Covid-19, in addition to city entrances. This paper uses four mega cities in China as the cases, which are Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou and Shenzhen. It uses a text-mining method to express online news about the anti-Covid-19 measures of communities in these case cities, and conducts a qualitative research on 1207 press releases, which are published by official media, institutions and self-media from January 2020 to September 2020. According to the analysis, the main anti-Covid-19 measures in community level include strengthening publicity by using mobile social media; clarifying the situation of every household; intensifying the management of neighborhood entrance; upgrading epidemic prevention and public health management; cooperation with all social forces; shortening the distance between daily necessities and residents, and preliminary applications of smart technology. On this basis, this article attempts to propose thoughts on enhancing community resilience, including orienting from space to human; using mobile social network apps to promote public participation; enhancing the flexibility of community planning; integrating risk management thinking into community planning and refining community governance with the help of smart technology.
Presenters
YZ
Yue Zeng
Project Director, Chengdu Jiuhe United Urban Planning And Design Co., Ltd.
'Place making as a multi –faceted tool in urban design’ – a strategic planning approach in case of Hubballi City, Karnataka, IndiaView Abstract
Research Paper 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM (Europe/Amsterdam) 2021/01/13 15:00:00 UTC - 2021/01/13 16:30:00 UTC
Cities are the main engines of economy & human activities attracting flux of population from rural to urban areas. These cities hold high potential to create synergies and allowing development opportunities. Cities are also the places where inequalities are stronger and, if they are not properly managed, their negative effects can surpass the positive ones. Thus, urban areas need to manage their development, supporting economic competitiveness, while enhancing social cohesion, environmental sustainability, quality of life and shape public realm in order to maximize shared value of a place. To ameliorate the situation there have been multiple efforts in terms of sustainability policies and missions, the most recent one being the ‘smart cities mission’ which also stresses the sustainable development of Indian cities. This paper is an attempt to fulfill the motive of the Smart Cities mission of sustainability by assessing Place making as a tool to configure waterfront dynamics to community engagement activities, to make people centric design which contribute to people’s health, happiness and well being. It is necessary to rethink on the matrix of urban design & urban planning in making cities more connected with its People – Place – Values. In the past, Hubbali City’s cultural matrix shared a symbiotic relationship with the green & blue networks that traversed the city in a manner that could be characterized as the urban commons. However, over the past few decades, industrialization, changing economic drivers, and dominance of private over public interests led to the over exploitation of natural resources. This in turn led the green and blue networks to be compromised and relegated to the background. However, on the contrary, today rivers or lakes are not more than sewers in the city, acting as a backyard & affecting the ground water table & ecology within the city. The present state of the city highlights the urgency & the impact of urban issues especially in these crucial times of climatic changes. Shifting land use patterns in the city have also resulted in disruptions to the overall continuity of the city’s urban form and loss of values & meanings that were traditionally associated with urban open spaces. Specifically in the case of Unkal Nala, a canal which originates from Unkal Lake in the northern end of Hubbali city, the urban growth patterns of the city have led to the concentration of low income houses along the water edges, self-build practices, illegal appropriation of spaces and illegal waste dumping into the water. All of these practices have caused the Unkal Nala, which was a source of sustenance in the past, to become the backyard or sewer of the city in present day Hubbali. The water edge and what used to function as the urban commons is now comprised of multiple examples of what Roger Trancik refers to as lost spaces. ‘Generally speaking, lost spaces are the undesirable urban areas that are in need of redesign- anti spaces, making no positive contribution to the surroundings or users. They are ill-defined, without measurable boundaries, and fail to connect elements in a coherent way. On the other hand, they offer tremendous opportunities to the designer for urban redevelopment and creative infill and for rediscovering the many hidden resources in our cities.’ This paper is an effort to draw attention to these lost spaces along Hubbali’s Unkal Nala and rethink in a holistic manner that is coherent to the present day needs of the city and its residents. It is an effort to redefine the urban commons through a place making approach.
Presenters Anita C. Jakkappanavar
Principal Architect - Architecture, Urban Design And Interiors, Pencil Line Office
The Spatial identity of hydraulic civilization of the Vistula delta river in Poland in the conditions of climate disasterView Abstract
Case Study Report 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM (Europe/Amsterdam) 2021/01/13 15:00:00 UTC - 2021/01/13 16:30:00 UTC
Disappearing spatial identity of the hydraulic civilization of the Vistula delta river in Poland influences potential, desirable behaviors of the water communities in the conditions of climate disaster. After the Second World War the cultural landscape of this area has changed due to a lack of understanding of the semantic code. An attempt to reconstruct the code, search for a strong identity of the delta region in the conditions of climate disaster is the purpose of the research. Is it possible to build resilience to climate change-related disasters? What role does the revitalization of waterways have in the process of spatial transformation? The answer to the research question about the impact of the climate catastrophe on resilience and spatial identity is important due to planning decisions. Processes that the region may undergo in the face of flood risk are associated with community behavior. Therefore, an attempt was made to analyze historical floods and related spatial transformations. A review of the literature and cartographic sources allows you to learn about the effects of floods. These are associated with the evolution of spatial development. Therefore, in the future, the probable solutions should be subjected to analysis that allows the identification of elements of the semantic code that affect the region's permanent resilience. The spatial identity of the hydraulic civilization of the Vistula delta river in Poland can be strengthened by a responsible, strong water community.
Presenters Anna Rubczak
Ph.D Student, Architect, Department Of Urban Design And Regional Planning, Faculty Of Architecture, Gdańsk University Of Technology
Post-Militar Landscape patrimony as a climate emergency escape to waterfront resilienceView Abstract
Research Paper 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM (Europe/Amsterdam) 2021/01/13 15:00:00 UTC - 2021/01/13 16:30:00 UTC
Coastal Artillery Regiment (RAC) is a unit of the Portuguese Army with the mission of guaranteeing the coastal defence of the ports of Lisbon and Setúbal. The set consists of fixed, secret, camouflaged and fortified batteries, installed along the entrance to the Sado and Tejo rivers. The structures are equipped with heavy artillery pieces. RAC was deactivated in 1998 and its archive was recently declassified. Abandoned on the coast as a skeleton, the bunker is the last theatrical gesture in the history of Western military architecture. Paul Virilio compares bunkers to seaside houses and asks why these mysterious structures cannot be perceived or recognised? This example of military architecture represents the exception that reveals total war in a mythical dimension. The mid-20th century bunker represents the climax of thousands of years of military architecture, from the Roman wall to the great wall and the fort. Its horizontality, strange underground configuration and rudeness material hide a high pragmatism and the brutalism reminds us that it is done on a war scale. The military field is a territorial field of action, but the cybernetization of systems allows the construction of this miniature scale with cyclothymic activity: hibernating during peacetime and awakening to war. Unlike previous forts, coast batteries were designed to be invisible. A new geography was created facing the coast of Western Europe, with several independent surveillance poles for territorial control (Bentham, 1791; Keith and Ottar, 1973; Foucault, 1975). Portuguese military architecture, in the period between Great World Wars, presents strategic changes of great impact on the morphological structure. Such adaptations follow the political and warlike developments of each of the international allied groups. With the disappearance of the alliance with Germany after the First War, Portugal establishes military relations with England, allowing the realisation of Plan B for the Defence of the Ports of Lisbon and Setúbal. Recently declassified, secret archives can now be studied and organised for the first time. Originally made by General Barron, from the UK War Office, was adapted to specific Portuguese conditions by national authorities and armed forces. The English plan establishes great intercontinental control, bringing together all its allies in the Atlantic, Mediterranean and Indian Sea. In times of technological advances, there is an inevitable change in the paradigm of military architecture. Technically obsolete structures have fallen into extinction. These territorial voids must be discussed in the inevitable territory reorganisation. Should they display archeology or just be absorbed in the surroundings? How to deal with post-military heritage? And lastly, how can we deal and operate in such a territorial resilience example, in a way to take profit from this particular long extension of waterfront regarding Climate Emergency.
Presenters Maria Rita Pais
Professor And Researcher, Universidade Lusófona De Humanidades E Tecnologias
Co-authors
KH
Katiuska Hoffmann
SC
Sandra Campos
PhD Student, ULHT
Forest and Climate Research Analyst
,
World Resources Institute Indonesia
Postgraduate Student
,
Chongqing University
Co-Founder and Director of Global Partnerships
,
#SmartCohort- UC Berkeley Center for Information Technology Research in Interest of Society (CITRIS) Foundry
Co-Founder & Head of Research
,
#SmartCohort
Chongqing University
+ 5 more speakers. View All
 Elizabeth Reynolds
Director
,
Urben
Mr Pedro Ressano Garcia
Senior Architect
,
Ressano Garcia, Arquitectos
Mr Mukhlis Silmi Kaffah
Student
,
Bandung Institute of Technology
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