Track 4: Safeguarding the Urban Resilience Virtual Room 2
Jan 13, 2021 01:30 PM - 03:00 PM(Europe/Amsterdam)
20210113T1330 20210113T1500 Europe/Amsterdam Track 4 | Session 2. Smart Resilience Strategies

The second day of Track 4 will begin with a keynote address from Qatar University on a decade of published research on data analytics for natural disaster management. Academics and practitioners from all corners of the globe will share their experiences of smart resilience strategies. Research from the Universidad Ricardo Palma presents the metropolis of Lima as two contradictory scenarios – with unsustainable urban growth at a metropolitan level occurring in parallel with sustainable development at a local level, ultimately needing strategies and legislation focused on collaborative governance. Research from the Silesian University of Technology in Poland takes a hyper local perspective in explaining the tools used social activists in the industrial city of Bytom to green their streets and public spaces. Tools for resilience planning in Egypt are presented, with the aim of helping urban communities achieve post (social and environmental) disaster recovery and resilience. Presenting their research with the Rockefeller Foundation and 100 Resilient Cities (now GRCN), Wood explains their Urban Resilience Screen – a diagnostic tool to help cities develop, design, and build projects that investors can fund. The University of Technology, New Zealand discuss how a collaborative design studio approach was taken when planning redevelopment of the Onehunga Port in Auckland, including engagement with the mana whenua (the indigenous people local to the area) – with the outcomes of the project including open-ended and propositional designs rather than the conventional masterplans. The session will conclude with the presentation of a case study from the ISOCARP Congress 2021 host country Qatar, with by the Public Works Authority (Ashghal) identifying models for t ...

Virtual Room 2 56th ISOCARP World Planning Congress, Virtual Congress congress@isocarp.org

The second day of Track 4 will begin with a keynote address from Qatar University on a decade of published research on data analytics for natural disaster management. Academics and practitioners from all corners of the globe will share their experiences of smart resilience strategies. Research from the Universidad Ricardo Palma presents the metropolis of Lima as two contradictory scenarios – with unsustainable urban growth at a metropolitan level occurring in parallel with sustainable development at a local level, ultimately needing strategies and legislation focused on collaborative governance. Research from the Silesian University of Technology in Poland takes a hyper local perspective in explaining the tools used social activists in the industrial city of Bytom to green their streets and public spaces. Tools for resilience planning in Egypt are presented, with the aim of helping urban communities achieve post (social and environmental) disaster recovery and resilience. Presenting their research with the Rockefeller Foundation and 100 Resilient Cities (now GRCN), Wood explains their Urban Resilience Screen – a diagnostic tool to help cities develop, design, and build projects that investors can fund. The University of Technology, New Zealand discuss how a collaborative design studio approach was taken when planning redevelopment of the Onehunga Port in Auckland, including engagement with the mana whenua (the indigenous people local to the area) – with the outcomes of the project including open-ended and propositional designs rather than the conventional masterplans. The session will conclude with the presentation of a case study from the ISOCARP Congress 2021 host country Qatar, with by the Public Works Authority (Ashghal) identifying models for the design of climate responsive pavements – supporting liveability in arid cities.  

Data Analytics of Natural Disaster Management: A decade of published researches View Abstract
Research Paper 01:30 PM - 03:00 PM (Europe/Amsterdam) 2021/01/13 12:30:00 UTC - 2021/01/13 14:00:00 UTC
Natural disasters have been an integral part of human history, regardless of geographical location. With the recent innovations in knowledge and data technologies, businesses have been collecting and analyzing data for decades to discover underlying trends and patterns. With massive amount of information available, authorities and rescuers should consider using relevant data to optimize natural disaster management processes. One of the recent techniques is to utilize data analytics where pertinent data is visualized in an easy to understand way. This paper aims at making a systematic review of scholarly literature in analyzing the trends of data analytics of natural disaster management and highlighting the present status of the emerging digital technologies in providing meaningful and effective intervention as solutions in natural disaster management. This paper will first presents the visual definition of natural disaster management and describes the role of data analytics; it will then illustrate the findings and gives future recommendations after a systematic literature review. A bibliometric analyses of researches on data analytics of natural disaster management in journals published from 2010 to 2020 are presented. Various relevant datasets are obtained by performing a series of topical searches using relevant keywords based on Scopus and Web of Science (WOS) search engines. Aggregation between the two sets of data are also conducted in order to avoid redundancy. Published documents are further analyzed using category ‘by source’, ‘by author and affiliation’, by country/territory’, ‘by type or subject area’, and ‘by funding sponsor’. Relevant outputs from SciVal (of Scopus) and Clarivate Analytics (of WOS), respectively are also offered to strengthen the conclusion. Findings conclude that despite the practicality of data analytics that is fast becoming a major trend in recent years, there is still lack of implementation in natural disaster management. Opportunities are also identified based on the needs for this research to be activated and expanded by leveraging on this emerging digital technologies ecosystem. In the event where natural disaster occurred, data analytics can sit on top of business intelligence and big data systems or any other ordinary database, to monitor and detect natural hazards, mitigate their impact, support in relief efforts, and contribute to the recovery and reconstruction processes. Keywords: data analytics, emerging digital technologies, bibliometric, natural disaster management, Scopus, Web of Science
Presenters
MK
MF Khamidi
Associate Professor, Qatar University
Co-authors
JB
Jiin Baek
Teaching Assistant, Qatar University
KR
Khamarrul Azahari Razak
Senior Lecturer, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia
One Metropolis, two scenarios. Sustainable Urban Development Contradictions in the Metropolitan Area of Lima.View Abstract
Research Paper 01:30 PM - 03:00 PM (Europe/Amsterdam) 2021/01/13 12:30:00 UTC - 2021/01/13 14:00:00 UTC
Despite the new urban planning thinking and legislation evolution since 2016 towards sustainable development, in practice, there is a limited legal framework for planning which makes it more challenging for local governments. As a result, two main scenarios have taken place in the Metropolitan Area of Lima: unsustainable urban growth at the metropolitan level, and sustainable urban development building at the local level. In an attempt to contextualize the current state of Lima’s territorial planning, the research captures the nature and trajectory of this contradiction to conduct the various trade-offs inherent in sustainable urban development. The results show that urban planning unawareness, and fragmented governance without continuity across government periods, have led to distrust at the metropolitan level diminishing its urban development towards social and environmentally sustainable development. However, integrated planning and collaborative governance with stakeholders enabled the strengthening of resilience with risk mitigation in informal urban settlements at the local level. The research concludes that new transformations call for new behaviors. Consequently, appropriate collaborative governance becomes a collective power for sustainable urban development growth.
Presenters Sally Torres
Teaching Assistant , Universidad Ricardo Palma
Analysis of the local communities focused around improving the quality of urban space on the example of activities in public space and cultural activities in Bytom Poland.View Abstract
Research Paper 01:30 PM - 03:00 PM (Europe/Amsterdam) 2021/01/13 12:30:00 UTC - 2021/01/13 14:00:00 UTC
Bytom is a post-industrial city looking for a new vision of the future. City dwellers are between a history related to coal and new challenges. It is not easy for them to understand that industry is a thing of the past and you need to look for yourself and your identity again. Groups of social leaders are trying to show a different picture of the city and engage more and more people to act for the city. Building the city's identity and new image are basic ideas. However, in the era of global discussion about climate change and the technologization of city life, it becomes important to become aware of the role of greenery and community. In the article I want to show how Bytom social activists promote and animate the local community in the spirit of collectivism and improving the quality of life in the city. The assumption of the described groups was the maximum involvement of residents in activities to improve the space in Bytom. In the article I want to show what tools they used and what effects they obtained. Particularly important here are activities that contribute to making the community aware of the role of greenery and pedestrian space. The effects of social activities show more clearly how important are strong communities opposing local authorities and supporting good investment decisions. Analysis of the activities of social groups showed how important local leaders play and how various methods and tools used by them gave measurable effects in the city space. The bottom-up activity helped to understand the advantages of a pedestrian city, which is Bytom, and to show how little it takes for the city to gain a new image.
Presenters Sylwia Widzisz-Pronobis
Phd Student, Silesian University Of Technology
GP
Grzegorz Pronobis
Owner, Pronobis Studio
The application of resilience planning concepts as a tool for Assessment and evaluating Egyptian urban communities to achieve resilience after disastersView Abstract
Research Paper 01:30 PM - 03:00 PM (Europe/Amsterdam) 2021/01/13 12:30:00 UTC - 2021/01/13 14:00:00 UTC
After the revolutions of the so-called Arab Spring which begin in Egypt at January 25, 2011, many disasters occurred in many Egyptian cities, and also significant changes in cities led to the emergence of severe shocks suffered by the community, including other subversive threats as "long-term social pressures" like unemployment and poor access Barriers to education, crime or homelessness, as well as deliberate sabotage of urban structures and infrastructure, directly or indirectly, have led to the deterioration of cities and the change of human behavior for the worse. The research aims to identify the concepts and methodology of resilience planning, and apply them to Egyptian cities that were exposed to disasters to increase the ability of communities to recover and adapt positively to changing circumstances or challenges - including disasters and climate change - and to maintain quality of life and healthy growth, and also permanent qualified systems, preserving resources for present and future generations. A community resilience plan or review includes the ability to understand policies, programs and other actions that can be taken in many sectors to improve a society's ability to cope with risks or change circumstances. Resilience planning can thus reduce future disaster response and recovery costs and improve recovery time after natural or human hazards events. The research will include the definition of resilience planning concepts, implications and objectives that aim to Update flexible land-use codes, zoning, development criteria, incentive programs, and other plans or policies to better prepare for potential shocks and pressures, and also help to develop standards that allow action against unexpected events. Key words resilience planning concepts - Disasters - Sabotage and destruction of cities - Development criteria - Disaster response measures
Presenters
SH
Said Hassanien Al-Sayed
Lecturer, Thebes Academy - High Engineering Istitute
ye
Youssef Elsayed
Droctor, High Institute Of Engineering-Thebes Academy For Sciences-Cairo-Egypt
SA
Sahar Abdelaziz
6 October University
Urban Resilience Fund Project Screen framework to fund and build resilient communitiesView Abstract
Session Proposal 01:30 PM - 03:00 PM (Europe/Amsterdam) 2021/01/13 12:30:00 UTC - 2021/01/13 14:00:00 UTC
Wood will discuss a resilience screen and framework that was developed within a consortium that included the Rockefeller Foundation, 100RC (now GRCN), Impact Infrastructure and Social Finance. This resilient infrastructure investment screen is being applied that will be applied to infrastructure projects across a range of sectors within cities to increase their resilience, improve smart integrated digital and technology solutions and evaluate those assets for potential funding from an investor-backed Urban Resilience Funds. This framework is helping to drive private investment into projects that can make communities more resilient in cities around the world. The goal of the framework is to deliver projects that are funded from urban investments and dedicated to implementing infrastructure that is both resilient and results in resilience for the communities they serve - representing a shift in project prioritization, development, implementation and financing. The goal of or investor-backed screen is to provide a pipeline of projects to the fund manager that are resilient and provide resilience value and with measurable KPI outputs across the following: 1) Developed through a resilience-based process; 2) The infrastructure project’s resilience to relevant and potential shocks and stresses; 3) Services that the infrastructure project delivers which contribute to overall city resilience; 4) Delivery includes key elements to ensure that projects maintain resilience value over the lifespan. Increasingly institutional investors (pension funds, sovereign wealth funds, insurance companies, etc.), are investing in resilient urban infrastructure projects that can be scalable and help address the world’s critical infrastructure financing gap (SDG Goal 9). Projects can also demonstrate the value of the resilience dividend to address other key sustainable development goals including making cities inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable (SDG Goal 11), reducing inequality (SDG Goal 10), and reducing poverty (SDG Goal 1). The TURF Project Screen and Investment Fund is being developed in partnership with leading influencers such the UNGC, S&P Global, World Bank/IFC, and the European Investment Bank (EIB) to optimize the impact this innovative program will have on global infrastructure and the communities that can directly benefit from these integrated and resilient projects. We will discuss how our global engineering, energy and infrastructure is integrating resilience into projects that create more resilient communities and support both recovering and renewal. Key areas to be reviewed include: • How to leverage expertise to identify climate change • Building for Impact by prioritizing projects and imbed resilience & sustainability into projects to reduce our city and community risks • Utilizing a turn-key project delivery framework to build projects more efficiently and for community impact • Infrastructure is a key to economic stimulus and better-connected infrastructure in growing cities offers meaningful economic and societal ROI if cities can better articulate the benefit it creates and who wins • Collaboration is needed to build robust investment cases and alignment on priorities and policies • How to use as proof points our initiatives with the likes of Citi, the Global Resilient Cities Network and the UN Global Compact involves working together with the financial sector to accelerate the uptake of sustainable and resilient infrastructure in the market.
Presenters Peter Hall
Global Director - Sustainable Infrastructure, Wood
A collaborative design studio approach to safeguard waterfront resilience in Auckland, Aotearoa New ZealandView Abstract
Research Paper 01:30 PM - 03:00 PM (Europe/Amsterdam) 2021/01/13 12:30:00 UTC - 2021/01/13 14:00:00 UTC
This paper discusses the potential of an interdisciplinary design studio to develop innovative thinking in response to the climatic and social challenges facing contemporary waterfront redevelopments. Climate change has a broad and growing range of environmental effects on coastal cities that demand urgent responses. The paper describes the development of a collaborative and interdisciplinary design studio that identified a number of design responses to meet the challenges of climate change. The studio brought together students and lecturers from architecture and landscape architecture along with relevant stakeholders (government agencies, practitioners, community) to collaborate on the redevelopment of the Onehunga Port in Auckland, Aotearoa New Zealand. Engagement with mana whenua (the indigenous people of specific areas of Aotearoa New Zealand) was critical. The students worked in teams to conduct critical research and design throughout a masterplanning design process. The outcomes of the studio included open-ended and propositional designs rather than the conventional masterplans. Students design work addressed complex problems, such as sea-level rise, to develop a more resilient urban future. Beyond the immediate objectives of the studio, the interdisciplinary collaboration demonstrated a range of benefits, including students learning to work in teams, sharing complementary views, broadening perspectives and increasing social awareness.
Presenters
LM
Lucia Melchiors
Lecturer, UNITEC Institute Of Technology
XW
Xinxin Wang
Lecturer, Unitec Institute Of Techonology
Co-authors
MB
Matthew Bradbury
Associate Professor, Unitec Institute Of Techonology
Engineering models for the design of long-lasting, sustainable, cost-efficient and climate-responsive pavements for Ashghal road projects in the State of QatarView Abstract
Research Paper 01:30 PM - 03:00 PM (Europe/Amsterdam) 2021/01/13 12:30:00 UTC - 2021/01/13 14:00:00 UTC
Transportation infrastructures are key components of the modern highly interconnected urban built environment, which in the post-oil era may require the adoption of optimized engineering models to be employed for the design of more sustainable solutions. In the specific case of road pavements, these quantitative analyses are essential in order to move away from standard materials and cross-sections, thereby promoting the use of local and recycled materials and of innovative technological solutions, while guaranteeing a long-lasting service life, a sufficiently low life-cycle environmental impact, and an adequate overall long-term economic efficiency. In geographical areas characterized by a hot and arid climate, modelling activities can be quite challenging and for densely populated urban centers they should also include the explicit consideration of the urban heat island effect. In the State of Qatar, all the abovementioned issues are being addressed by the Public Works Authority (Ashghal) through the activities of its Departments and by means of focused collaborations with industrial and academic partners. This paper provides an outline of the pavement-related engineering models that are being employed as part of the studies coordinated by the Quality and Safety Department (QSD) of Ashghal while taking into account local climatic conditions, availability of resources and economic constraints. Considered models span from those based on the physics of pavement structures – for the evaluation of heat transfer and mechanical damage – to those that refer to environmental and economic indicators – typically included in processes for life cycle assessment (LCA) and life cycle cost analysis (LCCA). Results provided in the paper show that the combined use of the illustrated models may be of significant value for the development of future infrastructures in the State of Qatar, provided that they are supported by adequate input data derived from either experimental investigations or sound engineering judgement. Finally, it should be emphasized that although ongoing studies in Qatar are being tailored for local implementation, it is envisioned that they may be fruitfully shared with the international community and that their results may be kept into consideration in other similar scenarios.
Presenters
ES
Ezio Santagata
Full Professor, Politecnico Di Torino
Co-authors
LT
Lucia Tsantilis
Politecnico Di Torino
IB
Ilaria Brignone Aimonetto
ANAS S.p.A. Qatar Branch
MM
Marco Marchiando
ANAS S.p.A. Qatar Branch
OI
Osman Elhusain Mohamed Idris
Quality And Safety Department, Public Works Authority
MA
Moaaz Hashim M.M. Ali
Quality And Safety Department, Public Works Authority
AA
Ali Mohammed Al-Marri
Manager, Quality And Safety Department, Public Works Authority
Associate Professor
,
Qatar University
Teaching Assistant
,
Universidad Ricardo Palma
Phd student
,
Silesian University of Technology
lecturer
,
Thebes Academy - High Engineering istitute
Global Director - Sustainable Infrastructure
,
Wood
+ 5 more speakers. View All
 Elizabeth Reynolds
Director
,
Urben
Mr Pedro Ressano Garcia
Senior Architect
,
Ressano Garcia, Arquitectos
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